Inside St. Andrews Church

The interior of this historic chapel

St. Andrew's is a small single room chapel, seating about 30 people. Once it would have had bare earth, but now it has a wooden floor, and raised stone chancel. Most of the structure has been replaced over the years, but the south wall, church door and bell are certainly from Herbert’s time.

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Features

In the north wall there is a closed medieval arch (suggesting Norman origins), in which there is now a display board listing all the past Rectors from 1344 onwards. In the south wall there is a small portal, possibly a 'lepers' squint'. The oak panelling and chancel rail are later additions.

The West Window

The West Window

Modern alterations include the west window in 1933, designed and executed by Caroline Townshend and Joan Hewson; it features George Herbert and his friend Nicholas Ferrar. The pews were put in in the 1960s. The altar frontal was designed by Jane Lemon and worked by the Sarum Embroiderers Guild in the 1980s. It illustrates Herbert's poem 'The Flower'.

The Altar Frontal

The Altar Frontal

Memorials

In the north wall, just beyond the chancel rail, is the simple plate commemorating George Herbert (the date 1632 accords with the calendar year used in the 17th century, which began on 25th March). Herbert's remains are said to interred beneath the chancel floor near to this plate.

Herbert's Memorial Plate

Herbert's Memorial Plate

Most of the other memorials in the chapel are to 7 former incumbents and their family members, mostly from the 18th and 19th Centuries, and also there are plaques dedicated to the two craftsmen responsible for carrying out much of the 1896 restoration work.

Guide for Visitors

For more details about the history, layout and interior features of St. Andrew's, download our PDF File Guide for Visitors.


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